Adam Rodgers2021-09-16T19:57:22+00:00

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On the second day of proceedings this week before the Canada Day long weekend, there were three featured items on the MCC agenda. First, there was an announcement on a schedule of significant witnesses who have been subpoenaed to appear over the summer. Then, there were two roundtable discussions, one on mental health impacts on first responders, and one on policing rural communities. 
Commissioner MacDonald read from a statement that the MCC has released on their website this morning, regarding significant witnesses from whom the Commission will hear over the summer months. They include Lisa Banfield (July 15), Supt. Darren Campell (July 25-26), Chief Supt. Chris Leather (July 27-28), Assistant Commissioner Lee Bergerman (August 22-23), and Commissioner Brenda Lucki (August 23-24). 
We will also hear from Cst. Greg Wiley (who has stated that he visited with Wortman over 15 times), Cst. Troy Maxwell, and Wortman’s former Portapique neighbour Brenda Forbes, though the dates have not been published. Cpl. Rodney Peterson will not testify, but will rather submit a sworn affidavit. 
The most notable part of that announcement is with respect to Ms. Banfield. Officers who participated in press conferences are testifying for two days, while the person who lived with the killer for 19 years, and spent the day with him before he went on his killing spree is going to testify for only one. It does not bode well for an in-depth examination of their lives together, or any hope that we will get a thorough examination of what lead to Wortman killing 22 people. In the midst of approximately 7-8 hours of available time, there will be breaks for lunch, two lawyer meetings to discuss what further questions should be asked, and perhaps additional breaks for Ms. Banfield to gather her strength. 
Just as significantly (and perhaps more so), there will be no cross examination of Ms. Banfield by lawyers for other participants. Instead, questions will need to be submitted to Commission lawyers, who will decide what questions will be asked.

On the second day of proceedings this week before the Canada Day long weekend, there were three featured items on the MCC agenda. First, there was an announcement on a schedule of significant witnesses who have been subpoenaed to appear over the summer. Then, there were two roundtable discussions, one on mental health impacts on first responders, and one on policing rural communities.
Commissioner MacDonald read from a statement that the MCC has released on their website this morning, regarding significant witnesses from whom the Commission will hear over the summer months. They include Lisa Banfield (July 15), Supt. Darren Campell (July 25-26), Chief Supt. Chris Leather (July 27-28), Assistant Commissioner Lee Bergerman (August 22-23), and Commissioner Brenda Lucki (August 23-24).
We will also hear from Cst. Greg Wiley (who has stated that he visited with Wortman over 15 times), Cst. Troy Maxwell, and Wortman’s former Portapique neighbour Brenda Forbes, though the dates have not been published. Cpl. Rodney Peterson will not testify, but will rather submit a sworn affidavit.
The most notable part of that announcement is with respect to Ms. Banfield. Officers who participated in press conferences are testifying for two days, while the person who lived with the killer for 19 years, and spent the day with him before he went on his killing spree is going to testify for only one. It does not bode well for an in-depth examination of their lives together, or any hope that we will get a thorough examination of what lead to Wortman killing 22 people. In the midst of approximately 7-8 hours of available time, there will be breaks for lunch, two lawyer meetings to discuss what further questions should be asked, and perhaps additional breaks for Ms. Banfield to gather her strength.
Just as significantly (and perhaps more so), there will be no cross examination of Ms. Banfield by lawyers for other participants. Instead, questions will need to be submitted to Commission lawyers, who will decide what questions will be asked.

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YouTube Video VVVjMGxmdnFpNHMzWk9wNmY1QzQtWkVRLmZnU1F4N3FoQm5B

MCC Day 42 – Key Witness Schedule Released, and Further Discussion Panels

Adam Rodgers 494 views June 30, 2022 7:35 pm

After a week of dramatic testimony and revelations which made national news, the MCC is looking to be much quieter as we end the month of June. Today, there was a seven-person roundtable discussion on the mental health needs of families and communities after a mass casualty incident. On Thursday, there will be a similar discussion, focused on the needs of first responders after a mass casualty.
Part of the mandate for the Commission is to examine issues around supports offered to the families of victims, affected citizens, police personnel, and the community. That means that there is a requirement to try to understand what supports might have been seen to be effective in other cases, and to compare them to what has happened in Nova Scotia following the shootings. Like with other areas that are to be studied, the MCC has taken that requirement and adopted a very (and perhaps overly) thorough approach.
There was no discussion of the specific events of the mass casualty of April 18-19, 2020 in Nova Scotia. Instead, the discussion (which lasted nearly five hours) was a broadly based one that brought in other examples of tragedies in other places, such as Norway, the 9/11 attacks in New York, and the Swiss Air crash of the coast of Nova Scotia.
The discussion was lead by Dr. Emma Cunliffe, who is the Research and Policy Director for the MCC. There were seven panelists (or, rather, roundtable participants) for the discussion. They were Grete Dyb from the University of Oslo, Levant Alten from Victim Support Europe, Mary Fetchet from Voices Centre for Resilience (a 9/11 support group), Great Village resident and former Norther Zone Grief Coordinator Serena Lewis, Megan McElheran from Wayfound Mental Health Group, Terry Mitchell from Wilfred Laurier University, and University of New York Associate Professor Jaclyn Schildkraut. The introduction portion of the discussion took half an hour to complete.

After a week of dramatic testimony and revelations which made national news, the MCC is looking to be much quieter as we end the month of June. Today, there was a seven-person roundtable discussion on the mental health needs of families and communities after a mass casualty incident. On Thursday, there will be a similar discussion, focused on the needs of first responders after a mass casualty.
Part of the mandate for the Commission is to examine issues around supports offered to the families of victims, affected citizens, police personnel, and the community. That means that there is a requirement to try to understand what supports might have been seen to be effective in other cases, and to compare them to what has happened in Nova Scotia following the shootings. Like with other areas that are to be studied, the MCC has taken that requirement and adopted a very (and perhaps overly) thorough approach.
There was no discussion of the specific events of the mass casualty of April 18-19, 2020 in Nova Scotia. Instead, the discussion (which lasted nearly five hours) was a broadly based one that brought in other examples of tragedies in other places, such as Norway, the 9/11 attacks in New York, and the Swiss Air crash of the coast of Nova Scotia.
The discussion was lead by Dr. Emma Cunliffe, who is the Research and Policy Director for the MCC. There were seven panelists (or, rather, roundtable participants) for the discussion. They were Grete Dyb from the University of Oslo, Levant Alten from Victim Support Europe, Mary Fetchet from Voices Centre for Resilience (a 9/11 support group), Great Village resident and former Norther Zone Grief Coordinator Serena Lewis, Megan McElheran from Wayfound Mental Health Group, Terry Mitchell from Wilfred Laurier University, and University of New York Associate Professor Jaclyn Schildkraut. The introduction portion of the discussion took half an hour to complete.

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YouTube Video VVVjMGxmdnFpNHMzWk9wNmY1QzQtWkVRLjFER2dmZi1nTHQw

MCC Day 41 – Roundtable on Needs of Family and Community After a Mass Casualty Incident

Adam Rodgers 493 views June 28, 2022 5:29 pm

The stage had been set for a hearing tomorrow morning on an application by Frank Magazine, supported by other media organizations, along with family participants, to have surveillance videos from the Enfield Big Stop be published as exhibits in the Mass Casualty Commission. The issue has been resolved, but how it played out has exposed what appears to be a rift between the MCC lawyers and the three Commissioners. 

David Hutt, a media lawyer at Burchells, has done excellent work leading the way on the application for Frank Magazine. The MCC was initially opposed to the videos being released, but now say that was all a big misunderstanding. The Federal DOJ had opposed the release as well, but once the MCC lawyers changed their minds, leaving the DOJ alone in opposition, they seem to have calculated that it would be worse to publicly state their untenable position and lose the application than to just let the videos be released. 

In the course of changing their minds, or at least their position, the MCC lawyers placed the blame squarely on the three Commissioners for the videos not being made public, and even went so far as to say they had not been told why that decision was made and could only presume what the Commissioners reasons may have been. 

This shot at the Commissioners by the MCC lawyers may be a response to the Commissioners' Interim Report, which reminded us all that they the Commissioners could only act on what was put before them by MCC lawyers, who they have instructed to be tenacious in their pursuit of the evidence. The message from the Commissioners seemed to be, if you have complaints about the MCC, don't blame us. 

We will hear what the Commissioners have to say about this in the morning. After that, and over the course of Monday and Tuesday, there will be "Small Group Sessions", which are apparently going to be different than "Roundtables" or "Panels" in some meaningful way that is not yet clear.

The stage had been set for a hearing tomorrow morning on an application by Frank Magazine, supported by other media organizations, along with family participants, to have surveillance videos from the Enfield Big Stop be published as exhibits in the Mass Casualty Commission. The issue has been resolved, but how it played out has exposed what appears to be a rift between the MCC lawyers and the three Commissioners.

David Hutt, a media lawyer at Burchells, has done excellent work leading the way on the application for Frank Magazine. The MCC was initially opposed to the videos being released, but now say that was all a big misunderstanding. The Federal DOJ had opposed the release as well, but once the MCC lawyers changed their minds, leaving the DOJ alone in opposition, they seem to have calculated that it would be worse to publicly state their untenable position and lose the application than to just let the videos be released.

In the course of changing their minds, or at least their position, the MCC lawyers placed the blame squarely on the three Commissioners for the videos not being made public, and even went so far as to say they had not been told why that decision was made and could only presume what the Commissioners reasons may have been.

This shot at the Commissioners by the MCC lawyers may be a response to the Commissioners' Interim Report, which reminded us all that they the Commissioners could only act on what was put before them by MCC lawyers, who they have instructed to be tenacious in their pursuit of the evidence. The message from the Commissioners seemed to be, if you have complaints about the MCC, don't blame us.

We will hear what the Commissioners have to say about this in the morning. After that, and over the course of Monday and Tuesday, there will be "Small Group Sessions", which are apparently going to be different than "Roundtables" or "Panels" in some meaningful way that is not yet clear.

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YouTube Video VVVjMGxmdnFpNHMzWk9wNmY1QzQtWkVRLmZ3X0tTa3pSS1ZF

Big Stop Video Drama Exposes MCC Divisions & The Week Ahead

Adam Rodgers 1.5K views June 12, 2022 8:12 pm

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