Adam Rodgers2021-09-16T19:57:22+00:00

GET EXCLUSIVE ACCESS

Subscribe to me on Patreon to get full access to all videos and exclusive analysis.

Access Premium Content On Patreon

Already a subscriber? You can login here.

Adam Rodgers has been a ground breaking inquiry, litigation and criminal defense lawyer as well as a leading business and political advisor.

Learn more about Adam

Latest Videos

This week, I provide a legal analysis of the appearances of federal cabinet ministers and the Prime Minister at the Emergencies Act Inquiry. The participants had been trying all week to figure out the legal advice the government had been given about the EA, but all cabinet ministers, including the Justice Minister, had refused to say what that advice had been, citing solicitor-client privilege. In last week's video, I speculated on what that advice may have been, and my views were effectively confirmed by the Prime Minister on Friday in his testimony. I discuss how that will be viewed by Justice Rouleau as he makes his determinations as to whether the extraordinary powers under the Act were justifiably invoked.
In this video, I also discuss the Nova Scotia Mass Casualty Commision closing submissions, dealing with policing recommendations and the important recommendations for changes to the legal structures around domestic violence complaints. 
Two other stories I briefly cover are a child protection decision out of NS where the Justice laments that Courts cannot order contact with biological parents when a permanent care order is made, and the Scottish government's failed attempt to convince the Supreme Court there that they alone (rather than the UK Parliament) can authorize a referendum on independence. This latter decision will have an impact on independence movements in other countries as well, including any Canadian province which might be considering such a move.

This week, I provide a legal analysis of the appearances of federal cabinet ministers and the Prime Minister at the Emergencies Act Inquiry. The participants had been trying all week to figure out the legal advice the government had been given about the EA, but all cabinet ministers, including the Justice Minister, had refused to say what that advice had been, citing solicitor-client privilege. In last week's video, I speculated on what that advice may have been, and my views were effectively confirmed by the Prime Minister on Friday in his testimony. I discuss how that will be viewed by Justice Rouleau as he makes his determinations as to whether the extraordinary powers under the Act were justifiably invoked.
In this video, I also discuss the Nova Scotia Mass Casualty Commision closing submissions, dealing with policing recommendations and the important recommendations for changes to the legal structures around domestic violence complaints.
Two other stories I briefly cover are a child protection decision out of NS where the Justice laments that Courts cannot order contact with biological parents when a permanent care order is made, and the Scottish government's failed attempt to convince the Supreme Court there that they alone (rather than the UK Parliament) can authorize a referendum on independence. This latter decision will have an impact on independence movements in other countries as well, including any Canadian province which might be considering such a move.

19 3

YouTube Video VVVjMGxmdnFpNHMzWk9wNmY1QzQtWkVRLlQzMFVzdFFLX1lz

Analysis of PM Trudeau at Emergencies Act, MCC Closing Submissions, and Scottish Referendum Decision

Adam Rodgers - Nova Scotia Lawyer 147 views 17 hours ago

Onslow Belmont Memo, NSCA Adjournments, Conflicted Crown, NSP Liability, CSIS at Emergencies Act Inq

Adam Rodgers - Nova Scotia Lawyer 305 views November 20, 2022 9:00 am

This week in Canadian law, the Emergencies Act Inquiry looked at the protests that were taking place at the Ambassador Bridge in Windsor, ON, as well as those at Coutts, Alta. In both cases, evidence presented seems to show that both protests were disruptive, but that the Emergencies Act was not necessary to deal with them.
Also during the Inquiry, one of the lawyers collapsed in the middle of questioning a witness. I discuss how a lawyer needs to be physically ready for court in order to be mentally sharp when it matters.
This week the Supreme Court of Canada upheld a mandatory minimum sentence for a woman convicted of importing nearly 2kg of cocaine through the Toronto Pearson Airport. This broke something of a trend of courts striking down Harper-era legislation on sentencing. The SCC said that it was up to Parliament to make changes to this legislation, as it did not offend the Charter as it was applied here, despite the accused being an Ojibwe woman and the issue of overincarceration of indigenous offenders.
Next, I review C-11 and C-18, both of which deal with online content regulation in Canada. C-11 would allow the CRTC to regulate user-generated content, and C-18 would restrict how news articles are shared on social media. Combined, these Bills would restrict freedom of expression online, and are not an appropriate response to revenue issues in the traditional media landscape.
Finally, I review a criminal case out of the NS Court of Appeal, where the Court reviewed how apologetic text messages sent after an alleged sexual assault may be used in a trial. It is not correct to have "repetition enhance credibility" but okay where the content amounts to an "admission".

This week in Canadian law, the Emergencies Act Inquiry looked at the protests that were taking place at the Ambassador Bridge in Windsor, ON, as well as those at Coutts, Alta. In both cases, evidence presented seems to show that both protests were disruptive, but that the Emergencies Act was not necessary to deal with them.
Also during the Inquiry, one of the lawyers collapsed in the middle of questioning a witness. I discuss how a lawyer needs to be physically ready for court in order to be mentally sharp when it matters.
This week the Supreme Court of Canada upheld a mandatory minimum sentence for a woman convicted of importing nearly 2kg of cocaine through the Toronto Pearson Airport. This broke something of a trend of courts striking down Harper-era legislation on sentencing. The SCC said that it was up to Parliament to make changes to this legislation, as it did not offend the Charter as it was applied here, despite the accused being an Ojibwe woman and the issue of overincarceration of indigenous offenders.
Next, I review C-11 and C-18, both of which deal with online content regulation in Canada. C-11 would allow the CRTC to regulate user-generated content, and C-18 would restrict how news articles are shared on social media. Combined, these Bills would restrict freedom of expression online, and are not an appropriate response to revenue issues in the traditional media landscape.
Finally, I review a criminal case out of the NS Court of Appeal, where the Court reviewed how apologetic text messages sent after an alleged sexual assault may be used in a trial. It is not correct to have "repetition enhance credibility" but okay where the content amounts to an "admission".

25 9

YouTube Video VVVjMGxmdnFpNHMzWk9wNmY1QzQtWkVRLlpFWGN0ZExwUTFv

Windsor & Coutts at POEI, Mandatory Minimums Upheld, Online Regulation, & Post Offence Text Msgs

Adam Rodgers - Nova Scotia Lawyer 176 views November 13, 2022 9:00 am

This week on the Rodgers Brief, I analyze the major law-related news stories of the week. The main topics this episode are;

1. The Emergency Act Inquiry in Ottawa. This week the protest 'leaders' take the stand, seemingly to show themselves as disorganized and non-violent. 
2. The Ontario government has announced that it will use the Notwithstanding Clause in the Charter of Rights and Freedoms to stop a strike from happening in the school system.
3. A group of private citizens is trying to organize what they call the National Citizens Inquiry, which would look into the government response to the Covid-19 pandemic. A private inquiry does not have the legal legitimacy of a public inquiry, but may yet have some value.
4. Lisa Banfield has filed a lawsuit against the Federal and Nova Scotia governments for having charged and prosecuted her for supplying ammunition to her spouse, Gabriel Wortman. I assess the strength of the lawsuit, and identify some of its weaknesses.

Other stories I mention include the Luomba case out of Quebec, dealing with racial profiling during traffic stops, an announcement that an independent land claims process has been agreed upon by First Nations leaders and the Federal government, and C-18, the Online News Act, which is a pay for clicks piece of legislation which has the potential to infringe considerably on our freedom of expression rights. 

I will be joining Jordan Bonaparte and Paul Palango tonight at 9:15 to discuss the Banfield lawsuit, and other Mass Casualty Commission issues. Here is the link for the Nighttime Podcast YouTube channel. 

https://www.youtube.com/c/NighttimePod

If you are interested in purchasing my alternate MCC report, Deficits of Trust, you can find it here;

Smashwords - https://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/ARodg19
Apple Books - https://books.apple.com/.../deficits-of.../id6444015396
Kobo - https://store.kobobooks.com/en-us/Search?Query=9781778104206
Barnes & Noble - https://www.barnesandnoble.com/s/2940165954481
Scribd - https://www.scribd.com/search?query=9781778104206&language=0

This week on the Rodgers Brief, I analyze the major law-related news stories of the week. The main topics this episode are;

1. The Emergency Act Inquiry in Ottawa. This week the protest 'leaders' take the stand, seemingly to show themselves as disorganized and non-violent.
2. The Ontario government has announced that it will use the Notwithstanding Clause in the Charter of Rights and Freedoms to stop a strike from happening in the school system.
3. A group of private citizens is trying to organize what they call the National Citizens Inquiry, which would look into the government response to the Covid-19 pandemic. A private inquiry does not have the legal legitimacy of a public inquiry, but may yet have some value.
4. Lisa Banfield has filed a lawsuit against the Federal and Nova Scotia governments for having charged and prosecuted her for supplying ammunition to her spouse, Gabriel Wortman. I assess the strength of the lawsuit, and identify some of its weaknesses.

Other stories I mention include the Luomba case out of Quebec, dealing with racial profiling during traffic stops, an announcement that an independent land claims process has been agreed upon by First Nations leaders and the Federal government, and C-18, the Online News Act, which is a pay for clicks piece of legislation which has the potential to infringe considerably on our freedom of expression rights.

I will be joining Jordan Bonaparte and Paul Palango tonight at 9:15 to discuss the Banfield lawsuit, and other Mass Casualty Commission issues. Here is the link for the Nighttime Podcast YouTube channel.

https://www.youtube.com/c/NighttimePod

If you are interested in purchasing my alternate MCC report, Deficits of Trust, you can find it here;

Smashwords - https://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/ARodg19
Apple Books - https://books.apple.com/.../deficits-of.../id6444015396
Kobo - https://store.kobobooks.com/en-us/Search?Query=9781778104206
Barnes & Noble - https://www.barnesandnoble.com/s/2940165954481
Scribd - https://www.scribd.com/search?query=9781778104206&language=0

40 9

YouTube Video VVVjMGxmdnFpNHMzWk9wNmY1QzQtWkVRLmZJd1JmOFVSMHpB

Emergency Act Inq., Notwithstanding Clause in Ontario, Covid-19 Inquiry, and Lisa Banfield Lawsuit

Adam Rodgers - Nova Scotia Lawyer 296 views November 6, 2022 11:00 am

"Deficits of Trust" - The Rodgers Brief NS Mass Casualty Commission Report Release Announcement

Adam Rodgers - Nova Scotia Lawyer 776 views October 17, 2022 3:59 pm

MCC Day 75 - Final Submissions and Commissioners Closing Remarks

Adam Rodgers - Nova Scotia Lawyer 470 views September 23, 2022 6:34 pm

Latest Blogs

Insider Legal Analysis of the Nova Scotia Mass Casualty Commission Public Inquiry

With my work representing the Personal Representative to the late Cpl. Lionel Desmond in the Desmond Fatality Inquiry coming to an end, I have an announcement on my next project. The Nova Scotia Mass Casualty Commission, which will examine the tragic events of April 18-19, 2020 in Portapique and other locations throughout Central Nova Scotia, is set to begin hearings on [...]

MCC Day 61 – Halifax Regional Police Chief Dan Kinsella

The Mass Casualty Commission heard today from Halifax Regional Police Chief Dan Kinsella today. Chief Kinsella was brought in to discuss the HRP role in the events of April 18-19, 2020, as well as the structure of policing in Nova Scotia. HRP and the RCMP each cover different areas of Halifax Regional Municipality, and so confront issues of interoperability on a [...]

MCC Day 60 – Commissioner Lucki Cross Examination Revelations

After spending over half the day yesterday on the stand, national RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki was back to give further testimony today. She was questioned yesterday by MCC lawyer Rachel Young, and Patterson Law’s Michael Scott, who was selected to be first to cross examine Comm. Lucki. Today, that cross examination continued. In my piece yesterday, I noted how Comm. Lucki [...]

MCC Day 59 – Commissioner Brenda Lucki and RCMP Leadership Conflicts

The MCC proceedings continued to focus today on the leadership of the RCMP, featuring continuing testimony from the now-retired former Commanding Officer for the RCMP in Nova Scotia, Lee Bergerman, and the current national Commissioner of the RCMP, Brenda Lucki. The contrast in leadership style and competence between the two was on stark display, and it was not a contrast that [...]

MCC Day 58 – NS RCMP Commanding Officer Lee Bergerman

After a three-week summer break, the Mass Casualty Commission resumed proceedings today, with testimony from retired Assistant Commissioner Lee Bergerman. Asst. Comm. Bergerman was the head of the RCMP in Nova Scotia at the time of the events of the mass casualty. She retired from the RCMP just before the MCC proceedings were set to start last October. The timing of [...]

MCC Day 57 – Participants’ Counsel Question Chief Superintendent Leather

The final day of Mass Casualty Commission proceedings before a three week break featured some revelations, expressions of regret, and careful answers from Chief Superintendent Chris Leather, who was the second ranking RCMP officer in Nova Scotia at the time of the events of the April 18-19, 2020 mass shooting. These all emerged from cross examination by lawyers for the family [...]

MCC Day 56 – Chief Superintendent Chris Leather

The Mass Casualty Commission continued to hear from senior NS-based RCMP commanders today, with testimony from Chief Superintendent Chris Leather. C/Sup Leather was the second ranking officer in Nova Scotia at the time of the events of the mass casualty. He was in Halifax after having testified Monday in Ottawa before the Federal Public Safety and National Security Subcommittee. Among the [...]

Go to Top