Adam Rodgers2021-09-16T19:57:22+00:00

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Adam Rodgers has been a ground breaking inquiry, litigation and criminal defense lawyer as well as a leading business and political advisor.

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Latest Videos

MCC Day 75 - Final Submissions and Commissioners Closing Remarks

Adam Rodgers 415 views September 23, 2022 6:34 pm

The second last day of proceedings from the Mass Casualty Commission featured closing submissions and recommendations from Lisa Banfield's lawyer Jessica Zita, as well as those from LEAF/Avalon Sexual Assault Centre, Feminists Against Femicide, the RCMP Veterans Association of NS, the Truro Police, as well as firearms advocacy and opposition groups.
Ms. Zita spoke about how Ms. Banfield (who, it appeared, was not present) was revictimized by the deceptive manner in which she was treated by the RCMP. She urged the MCC to accept what Ms. Banfield has claimed, and to agree that Ms. Banfield bore no responsibility for anything that her spouse did (despite, she did not add, her knowledge of him having a replica police car, illegal guns, and deteriorating mental health).
Erin Breen rightly identified cross-border smuggling as a central issue, and noted how Wortman obtained a Nexus pass despite having a firearms complaint on the national police database at the time he applied for it. 
Neither Brian Carter for the RCMP Veterans nor Charles Thompson for the Truro Police explicitly called for the removal of the RCMP from NS, but that conclusion flowed naturally from both presentations. The Truro Police are hopeful that new RCMP leadership in NS is reason for optimism. 
The MCC will be back (weather depending) tomorrow for the final submissions by the BC Civil Liberties Association, the NS Dept. of Justice, National Police Federation, and the Federal Dept. of Justice.

The second last day of proceedings from the Mass Casualty Commission featured closing submissions and recommendations from Lisa Banfield's lawyer Jessica Zita, as well as those from LEAF/Avalon Sexual Assault Centre, Feminists Against Femicide, the RCMP Veterans Association of NS, the Truro Police, as well as firearms advocacy and opposition groups.
Ms. Zita spoke about how Ms. Banfield (who, it appeared, was not present) was revictimized by the deceptive manner in which she was treated by the RCMP. She urged the MCC to accept what Ms. Banfield has claimed, and to agree that Ms. Banfield bore no responsibility for anything that her spouse did (despite, she did not add, her knowledge of him having a replica police car, illegal guns, and deteriorating mental health).
Erin Breen rightly identified cross-border smuggling as a central issue, and noted how Wortman obtained a Nexus pass despite having a firearms complaint on the national police database at the time he applied for it.
Neither Brian Carter for the RCMP Veterans nor Charles Thompson for the Truro Police explicitly called for the removal of the RCMP from NS, but that conclusion flowed naturally from both presentations. The Truro Police are hopeful that new RCMP leadership in NS is reason for optimism.
The MCC will be back (weather depending) tomorrow for the final submissions by the BC Civil Liberties Association, the NS Dept. of Justice, National Police Federation, and the Federal Dept. of Justice.

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YouTube Video VVVjMGxmdnFpNHMzWk9wNmY1QzQtWkVRLnBEZWsxcjRlWnZz

MCC Day 74 - Final Submissions From L. Banfield, Women's Groups, Truro Police, and Firearms Groups

Adam Rodgers 451 views September 22, 2022 7:18 pm

There were four closing submission presentations today, by lawyers representing the brother of Scott MacLeod, the Gina Goulet family, the Oliver/Tuck family, and a lawyer representing Women's Shelter Canada, Transition House of NS, and Be the Peace Institute. The lawyer for Lisa Banfield was scheduled to speak, but had travel delays coming from Toronto, and will instead by speaking at 9am tomorrow.
This was the last day for representations from lawyers representing family members lost in the shootings. Some of the issues covered were similar to those raised yesterday. Notably, none of the lawyers for the family have called for the removal of the RCMP as the policing agency for NS, and none of the family lawyers spoke at any length about domestic violence. Certainly, none placed it as a central issue. 
Jamie Goodwin, on behalf of the Women's Shelter/Transition House/Be the Peace group advocated for the criminalization of 'coercive control', though did not develop the idea to the extent that I think would be required to persuade the Commissioners. Perhaps the women's organizations that are lined up to speak tomorrow will give a more thorough and compelling reasoning for that, or other related recommendations. The MCC seems determined to make an impact on the prevalence of domestic and intimate partner violence in this province, but I discuss here how there has not yet been anything substantive proposed that would accomplish that laudable goal.

There were four closing submission presentations today, by lawyers representing the brother of Scott MacLeod, the Gina Goulet family, the Oliver/Tuck family, and a lawyer representing Women's Shelter Canada, Transition House of NS, and Be the Peace Institute. The lawyer for Lisa Banfield was scheduled to speak, but had travel delays coming from Toronto, and will instead by speaking at 9am tomorrow.
This was the last day for representations from lawyers representing family members lost in the shootings. Some of the issues covered were similar to those raised yesterday. Notably, none of the lawyers for the family have called for the removal of the RCMP as the policing agency for NS, and none of the family lawyers spoke at any length about domestic violence. Certainly, none placed it as a central issue.
Jamie Goodwin, on behalf of the Women's Shelter/Transition House/Be the Peace group advocated for the criminalization of 'coercive control', though did not develop the idea to the extent that I think would be required to persuade the Commissioners. Perhaps the women's organizations that are lined up to speak tomorrow will give a more thorough and compelling reasoning for that, or other related recommendations. The MCC seems determined to make an impact on the prevalence of domestic and intimate partner violence in this province, but I discuss here how there has not yet been anything substantive proposed that would accomplish that laudable goal.

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YouTube Video VVVjMGxmdnFpNHMzWk9wNmY1QzQtWkVRLkllbTgxcEVBVXZN

MCC Day 73 - Day Two of Closing Submissions

Adam Rodgers 401 views September 21, 2022 7:05 pm

The Mass Casualty Commission hosted two talking circles today, featuring indigenous persons from across Nova Scotia. The participants discussed their experiences of the morning of April 19, 2020, their views on the institutions serving Nova Scotians, and their views on policing.
An interesting comparison was made with the lack of a trusting relationship between the police and indigenous communities, and the current lack of trust that Nova Scotians more broadly are feeling following the events of the mass casualty.
The Commissioners were very respectful of the participants, perhaps to the point of being patronizing, but perhaps genuinely. The three Commissioners participated in the talking circle along with everyone else, and leaned less on scripted remarks than on other days. 
There were also some news articles that came out in the past few days dealing with other elements of the MCC. Seemingly in an attempt to rehabilitate his own reputation, former Justice Minister Mark Furey (who was an RCMP Staff Sergeant prior to running for office) has claimed in an affidavit that it was the RCMP's failure to accept his 2012 recommendation to adopt emergency alerts that lead to his early retirement. This is difficult to swallow from the very person who may have been best positioned in years that followed to have implemented an emergency alert system for active shooter situations. 
I also discuss the election of Pierre Poilievre as leader of the Conservative Party of Canada, and what impact that may have on potential adoption of MCC recommendations.

The Mass Casualty Commission hosted two talking circles today, featuring indigenous persons from across Nova Scotia. The participants discussed their experiences of the morning of April 19, 2020, their views on the institutions serving Nova Scotians, and their views on policing.
An interesting comparison was made with the lack of a trusting relationship between the police and indigenous communities, and the current lack of trust that Nova Scotians more broadly are feeling following the events of the mass casualty.
The Commissioners were very respectful of the participants, perhaps to the point of being patronizing, but perhaps genuinely. The three Commissioners participated in the talking circle along with everyone else, and leaned less on scripted remarks than on other days.
There were also some news articles that came out in the past few days dealing with other elements of the MCC. Seemingly in an attempt to rehabilitate his own reputation, former Justice Minister Mark Furey (who was an RCMP Staff Sergeant prior to running for office) has claimed in an affidavit that it was the RCMP's failure to accept his 2012 recommendation to adopt emergency alerts that lead to his early retirement. This is difficult to swallow from the very person who may have been best positioned in years that followed to have implemented an emergency alert system for active shooter situations.
I also discuss the election of Pierre Poilievre as leader of the Conservative Party of Canada, and what impact that may have on potential adoption of MCC recommendations.

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YouTube Video VVVjMGxmdnFpNHMzWk9wNmY1QzQtWkVRLnh0X190Y3FKRVhZ

MCC Day 69 - Indigenous Consultation and Political Positioning

Adam Rodgers 338 views September 13, 2022 11:10 pm

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MCC Day 60 – Commissioner Lucki Cross Examination Revelations

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MCC Day 58 – NS RCMP Commanding Officer Lee Bergerman

After a three-week summer break, the Mass Casualty Commission resumed proceedings today, with testimony from retired Assistant Commissioner Lee Bergerman. Asst. Comm. Bergerman was the head of the RCMP in Nova Scotia at the time of the events of the mass casualty. She retired from the RCMP just before the MCC proceedings were set to start last October. The timing of [...]

MCC Day 57 – Participants’ Counsel Question Chief Superintendent Leather

The final day of Mass Casualty Commission proceedings before a three week break featured some revelations, expressions of regret, and careful answers from Chief Superintendent Chris Leather, who was the second ranking RCMP officer in Nova Scotia at the time of the events of the April 18-19, 2020 mass shooting. These all emerged from cross examination by lawyers for the family [...]

MCC Day 56 – Chief Superintendent Chris Leather

The Mass Casualty Commission continued to hear from senior NS-based RCMP commanders today, with testimony from Chief Superintendent Chris Leather. C/Sup Leather was the second ranking officer in Nova Scotia at the time of the events of the mass casualty. He was in Halifax after having testified Monday in Ottawa before the Federal Public Safety and National Security Subcommittee. Among the [...]

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